• The best books on Venice - The Stones of Venice by John Ruskin
  • The best books on Venice - Italian Venice: A History by R.J.B. Bosworth
  • The best books on Venice - The Girl from Venice by Martin Cruz Smith
  • The best books on Venice - The Architectural History of Venice by Deborah Howard
  • The best books on Venice - Death in a Strange Country by Donna Leon

The best books on Venice, recommended by Matthew Rice

Venice once ruled an empire that stretched across the eastern Mediterranean, but by the early modern period was already evolving into a city whose greatest claim to fame was as a tourist destination. Here Matthew Rice, author and illustrator of Venice: A Sketchbook Guide, recommends books to read about Venice and its history and architecture, as well as a couple of crime thrillers to read while you’re there.

  • The best books on Italy’s Risorgimento - The Nation of the Risorgimento: Kinship, Sanctity and Honour in the Origins of Unified Italy by Alberto Mario Banti
  • The best books on Italy’s Risorgimento - The Antiquity of the Italian Nation: The Cultural Origins of Political Myth in Modern Italy by Antonino De Francisco
  • The best books on Italy’s Risorgimento - Risorgimento in Exile: Italian Emigrés and the Liberal International in the Post-Napoleonic Era by Maurizio Isabella
  • The best books on Italy’s Risorgimento - Garibaldi: Invention of a Hero by Lucy Riall
  • The best books on Italy’s Risorgimento - Monarchie et Identité Nationale en Italie (1861-1900) by Catherine Brice

The best books on Italy’s Risorgimento, recommended by Carlotta Ferrara degli Uberti

Italian unification was one of the great political dramas of 19th century Europe, transforming a patchwork of territories speaking different languages into the nation-state of Italy. Here, historian Carlotta Ferrara degli Uberti discusses the people and ideas that brought it about and how its disputed legacy continues to impact Italy today.

  • The best books on Italian Political Philosophy - Discourses on Livy by Niccolo Machiavelli, trans. Harvey Mansfield and Nathan Tarcov
  • The best books on Italian Political Philosophy - The New Science of Giambattista Vico: Unabridged Translation of the Third Edition (1744) by Giambattista Vico, trans. Max Harold Fisch and Thomas Goddard Bergin
  • The best books on Italian Political Philosophy - The History of European Liberalism by Guido De Ruggiero, trans. R. G. Collingwood
  • The best books on Italian Political Philosophy - Prison Notebooks by Antonio Gramsci, trans. Joseph A. Buttigieg and Antonio Callari
  • The best books on Italian Political Philosophy - Liberalism and Democracy by Norberto Bobbio, trans. Martin Ryle and Kate Soper

The best books on Italian Political Philosophy, recommended by Guglielmo Verdirame

Italy has a rich tradition of political philosophy, producing a number of thinkers with both practical experience and a cosmopolitan outlook. Here Guglielmo Verdirame, Professor of International Law at King’s College London, talks us through the five most important Italian political philosophers, and the best books to read to understand their work.

  • The best books on The Venetian Empire - Venice: A Documentary History 1450-1630 by Brian Pullan & David Chambers
  • The best books on The Venetian Empire - The Military Organization of a Renaissance State: Venice 1400-1617 by John Rigby Hale & Michael E. Mallett
  • The best books on The Venetian Empire - Venice: A Maritime Republic by Frederic Chapin Lane
  • The best books on The Venetian Empire - Venice: the Hinge of Europe by William McNeill
  • The best books on The Venetian Empire - The Venetian Empire: A Sea Voyage by Jan Morris

The best books on The Venetian Empire, recommended by Georg Christ

The Venetian Republic was one of the mightiest empires of early modern Europe, with its Terraferma dominions on land and a maritime empire, the Stato da Màr,  that stretched across the Mediterranean. Its unique strength lay in long-distance trade and, as historian Georg Christ explains, in some ways, it resembled a company more than a state. Here, he recommends books to better understand the Venetian empire, what it was and how it grew.

  • The best books on Galileo Galilei - Life of Galileo by Bertolt Brecht
  • The best books on Galileo Galilei - Galileo’s Telescope: A European Story by Franco Giudice, Massimo Bucciantini and Michele Camerota, translated by Catherine Bolton
  • The best books on Galileo Galilei - Letters to Father: Sister Maria Celeste to Galileo by Suor Maria Celeste (Virginia Galilei) and Dava Sobel (editor and translator)
  • The best books on Galileo Galilei - On Trial for Reason: Science, Religion, and Culture in the Galileo Affair by Maurice A. Finocchiaro
  • The best books on Galileo Galilei - Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems by Galileo Galilei & Stillman Drake (trans.)

The best books on Galileo Galilei, recommended by Paula Findlen

The trial of Galileo by the Roman Inquisition was one of the most public confrontations between the new science emerging in the 17th century and the Catholic Church but, nearly 400 years later, there’s still a lot of scope to argue what it was about. Here historian of science Paula Findlen, a professor at Stanford University, explains the endless fascination of Galileo Galilei, the Renaissance man who turned a telescope to the sky and took the world by storm, and recommends the best books to start learning more about him.

  • The best books on Augustus - Catiline’s War, The Jugurthine War, Histories Sallust (trans. AJ Woodman)
  • The best books on Augustus - Res Gestae Divi Augusti: Text, Translation, and Commentary by Alison Cooley (editor) & Augustus
  • The best books on Augustus - Rome's Cultural Revolution by Andrew Wallace-Hadrill
  • The best books on Augustus - The Neighborhoods of Augustan Rome by J. Bert Lott
  • The best books on Augustus - Augustan Culture by Karl Galinsky

The best books on Augustus, recommended by Peter Wiseman

Is it possible that Augustus was not the first Roman emperor, but the last of Rome’s great populist champions? That’s what classicist Peter Wiseman argues in his book, The House of Augustus: A Historical Detective Story. Drawing on a lifetime of research and writing on this period, the emeritus professor of classics and ancient history gives a brilliant overview of the Augustan age, and recommends what to read to better understand the adopted son of Julius Caesar, who found Rome in brick and left it in marble.